Stress Part 2: Why Do We Stress When We Have A Savior?

Welcome to Part 2 of our look at stress. In Part 1 we introduced our passage, defined stress, and also distinguished between good (eustress) and bad (distress) stress. We’re focusing on the bad stress, since it’s the detrimental kind that hinders us.
Paul speaks to distress and anxiety in Philippians 4:4-7:

  1. Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. 
  2. Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand;
  3. do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. 
  4. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus. (Philippians 4:4-7 ESV)

We then ended by questioning our stress. Why does a Christian stress? Why do you stress?
I stressed over a busy Friday. I was frantically balancing responsibilities and it wore me down. I was overwhelmed.

But in the span of eternity, my little Friday was a fraction of the vapor that is my life. I’ve been given an eternity in paradise with my Savior. So why did I still get overcome with stress and worry?

1.We’re Strangers in This Fallen World

Stevin Curtis Chapman has a wonderful song called Long Way Home. He speaks to the struggle we face in this world, and how we’re just passing through. It really changes the whole perspective when focus on our real life staring after this one. It brings to mind this verse:

33. I have said these things to you, that in me you may have peace. In the world you will have tribulation. But take heart; I have overcome the world. (John 16:33)

Christ has overcome my stressful Friday, your financial hardships, your broken relationships, your sorrows, your heartbreak, the world. We have His blessed assurance and a peace that surpasses all understanding (verse 7). We can remain grounded because our Savior purchased our salvation and gave us a heavenly home. Thanks to Christ’s resurrection, our real life begins after this one ends.

The eternity in Heaven praising our savior is the perfect, complete reward. Paradise is a beautiful place where there’s no tears or heartache. We should be longing to get there! If we have this reward, every little bump on the journey there is negligible. Paul says in another letter that even death has lost its sting. Nothing that happens on Earth can deter us from our home. We can find comfort in what’s coming before us!

But it’s very important here that we make sure we’re practical. Paul draws attention to this in verse 5 where he speaks to our reasonableness:
5. Let your reasonableness be known to everyone. The Lord is at hand; (Philippians 4:5)
We should not be too heavenly minded to be of any earthly good. Rather, our blessed assurance and peace from God mentioned in verse 7 should anchor us in this life, to press towards our real home.

This fallen creation still ultimately points to its Creator, despite our misuse of every aspect of it. As Chrsitians we’re called to redeem creation. This saving grace of Christ and intimate relationship with God have serious implications for all areas of our life on Earth. Even the stressful ones. We can handle our stressful finances, relationships, responsibilities, obligations, and pressures in ways that glorify Christ and grow His kingdom.

Yes, stress and hardships are eminent. We will feel defeated. We will feel that all is lost. But our heavenly home awaits us, and we’re called to bring as many with us as we can. Press towards the mark of the high calling!

2. We Lose Sight of our Goal

If we shift the paradigm to realizing that we’re only passing through, we should be heavenly minded. That’s quite easy to say, but it’s easy to be overwhelmed by our life on Earth. Now this is a real physical place, and most of the time our stressors are reasonable.
Finances are necessary to life, relationships are our family, friends, and how we witness and lead others to Christ, work is how provide for our families. There are all valid endeavors that need to be attended to.

The problem is when these things tear at us and cripple us.

Paul’s use of this Greek word conveys our stress better than our English. He uses the word “merimnáō” which properly translates to being drawn in opposite directions or divided into parts. The context here suggests that Paul was harnessing its figurative interpretation: “to go to pieces” due to being pulled apart. Paul said like the force exerted by sinful anxiety that tears us into pieces.

And that’s exactly how it feels, doesn’t it? It feels like you’re being torn in a hundred different directions. It can feel like the life you’ve built is crumbling. You only see a thousand bricks instead of the building Christ can build from it.

This happens when we give the carnal issues more attention than we give Christ. We lose our focus on Christ. We see this here as Paul in verse 4 tells us to rejoice. He even tells us twice.
4. Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. (Philippians 4:4)
If we’re rejoicing in the Lord we’ll have Him on our minds and hearts, thus minimizing the temporary hiccups we’ll have in our life of praise.  We have to adjust to the bigger picture and its painter. If we fix our eyes on Jesus, the troubles of this life pale in comparison to His grace and beauty. Our focus should be on Christ and the guidance of the Spirit, not the flesh.

6. For to set the mind on the flesh is death, but to set the mind on the Spirit is life and peace. (Romans 8:6 ESV)

That’s easy to say and read, but it’s a little different applying it. When rent’s due and the bills come up and the fridge is empty and your mother is sick and your brakes go out and your world is crumbling down around you the last thing you wanna do is lead others Christ. I realize that’s my whole reason for being on Earth and all, but I’ve got to handle my business first before I have an awkward, uncomfortable conversation with someone.

When I compare my struggles to the cross, it can’t help but seem pointless. Christ has overcome this world and my little problems, and I have a home prepared for me in Heaven. Christ has overcome death, both the physical and spiritual. He’s calling me to be His messenger, and to bring others home. That has to be my focus, not stressing over the temporary complications of this life. Leading others to the salvation of Christ is the goal, and I cannot lose sight of it.

So why do we stress when we have a Savior?
Simple. Our perspective is wrong. We lose sight of our home and our mission. We are strangers in this fallen world that will face inevitable troubles, but our eternity in Heaven with our savior makes every one of those issues irrelevant.  On my journey to Heaven, I’m called to bring others with me. Leading others to Christ is the goal that outshines every possible problem I could ever have on Earth.

So I want to encourage you, Church. When you’re torn in different directions by sinful worry and stress, remember to keep your home and your goal in perspective.

Thank you for reading! I pray you’ll join me for part 3 where we’ll see how we should respond to stress.

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